Testing Accommodations

Instructors must ensure that the test scores of individuals with disabilities accurately reflect the individual’s aptitude or achievement level or whatever skill the exam or test is intended to measureAn instructor must administer an exam so that it accurately reflects an individual’s aptitude, achievement level, or the skill that the exam purports to measure, rather than the individual’s impairment (except where the impaired skill is one the exam purports to measure). DOJ Technical Assistance  

  • Example: An individual may be entitled to the use of a basic calculator during exams as a testing accommodation.  If the objective of the test is to measure one’s ability to solve algebra equations, for example, and the ability to perform basic math computations (e.g., addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division), is secondary to the objective of the test, then a basic calculator may be an appropriate testing accommodation.  If, however, the objective of the test is to measure the individual’s understanding of, and ability to perform, math computations, then it likely would not be appropriate to permit a calculator as a testing accommodation.
  • Example: An individual may be entitled to extended time as a testing accommodation.  If the objective of the test is to measure mastery of content, and the ability to complete the test in a definitive amount of time is secondary, then extended time is an appropriate accommodation.  If, however, the primary objective is to measure the individual’s time to complete an activity, then it likely would not be appropriate to permit extended time as an accommodation.

Learn how to set up proctoring through the DSO